Love and Live Life by Finding Your Passion

Hi fishing folks. If you are reading this column, that means you are alive. And, if you are alive, you have been given the gift of time. Time is the most precious of all gifts. Time is something that can’t be seen. Time is something that can be measured, but cannot be held onto forever. But…time is something that can be wasted. We only have so much time, so now is the time to take action. Time is something to be treasured and appreciated.

I have truly been given the most precious of man’s many gifts. I am alive, I am healthy, and I am living the American Dream—I get to do what I love to do for a living! And you, too, have the same opportunity.

Passion, preparation and persistence…it’s the only way that I know how a person can achieve the ultimate life experience. Live your dream. Here are some tips to do this:

Find something that you love to do. If you haven’t found it yet, that’s okay, keep looking. You are on this earth for a reason.

Take the time to prepare. Once you’ve found your passion, learn. Study your craft, practice, do what it takes to be the best at it.

Then, keep doing it until you cannot do it anymore. Enjoy it.

Do not quit! Keep at it until someone notices you. Believe me, someone will take notice. You never know who is watching, who is thinking, if he did it, maybe I can, too. Even if they don’t, you will have lived life on your terms.

Then help the next person. And the next, and the next. Pass along your knowledge to help someone else.

What if you lose the passion? If you get tired, beaten down, and even feel like maybe you’re done with this life experience…hold on. You’re not alone. We all go through rough times. Then pick yourself up and keep on keeping on. Reach out if you need help. Talk to a friend, a mentor. I believe in you, and I know you can make a difference in this life.

Thunder-stealers are out there. There are always people in life who try to steal your passion. Don’t get distracted by them. They are sometimes in your life to test you and help you achieve the next level.

How I found my passion

My father and mother took me fishing when I was a small child. My dad was the most amazing person that I have ever known. He taught me fishing and he taught me life lessons. He taught me to treat others like I would like to be treated. He taught me to turn the other cheek, even when I was struck down. He taught me to believe in others and love them for who they are. He was a very wise man.

Maybe, that is why I have always loved to fish…because of my father. It is a sport that requires patience, persistence, passion and a love of God’s creation—the great outdoors. Anyone can fish…young, old, man, woman, healthy, disabled or sick. Anyone. It connects people.

Of course, there have been a few times when fishing has felt mundane, a business and just a job. Every once in a while, I get tired of competing in tournaments, feeling like I should never “get skunked,” and relentlessly conducting seminars and promoting the sport of fishing. Kind of like, “It’s time to make the donuts.” But deep down, I have always loved fishing. And for me, fishing for a living definitely beats digging ditches, taking out teeth or the sight of blood. No offense. Those jobs are essential; they just aren’t my passion.

But then I think, I get to do what I love to do for a living—And you can, too. Time is your friend in this regard, just like investing in long-term stocks.

I am encouraging you today to do something that you love to do. Be the best at it that you can be. Keep doing it until your last, dying breath. And help the next person. For if you do that, you will know true joy, and that you have done what you were meant to do in life.

Love life, live life, love others, inspire others, be happy, and ultimately, love yourself. If you’ve lost your passion, reclaim it today. If you haven’t found your passion, keep looking! If you are lucky enough to be living your passion, celebrate by sharing it with someone else and encouraging them.

Your friend,

Ted Takasaki—Just another Fisherman